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The fast-food chain Chipotle Mexican Grill will pay $20 million to current and former workers at its New York City restaurants for violating city labor laws. The settlement between the city and Chipotle was announced Tuesday. It covers about 13,000 employees who worked at the chain’s New York City outlets between 2017 and this year. The $20 million deal is the largest worker protection settlement in New York City history. Scott Boatwright, Chipotle’s chief restaurant officer, said the restaurant chain is pleased to be able to resolve the issues. He said Chipotle has taken steps to improve compliance.

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A Palestinian hunger striker who his family says has refused food for the past five months and is wasting away in an Israeli jailhouse infirmary has suddenly been thrust into the center of efforts to firm up a Gaza cease-fire. Khalil Awawdeh is in the spotlight because the Islamic Jihad group sought his release as part of Egyptian-brokered talks that ended three days of fighting between the Gaza-based militants and Israel over the weekend. Prospects for his release are uncertain. But his case highlights the plight of hundreds of Palestinians who are being held by Israel under a system that critics say denies them the right to due process.

As CEO of the Community Foundation of Greater Flint, Isaiah Oliver is well known throughout the city. Now as families recover from the water crisis and the pandemic, the foundation and Oliver are building on their reserve of trust and their proximity to the community. As the foundation’s first Flint native and first Black leader since it was founded in 1988, Oliver works to build bridges between marginalized people and wealthy donors.  Even more than the erosion of the city’s water pipes, “the erosion of trust was the biggest issue that came out of the water crisis,” Oliver said in an interview in his office. Rebuilding trust in institutions is a continuing process.

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Janice Bluestein Longone, who is credited with collecting thousands of items chronicling the culinary history of the United States, has died at age 89. Nie Family Funeral Home in Ann Arbor, Michigan, says Longone died Wednesday. The cause and location of death weren't announced. Longone collected thousands of cookbooks, menus, advertisements, diaries, letters and other items related to American cooking. That collection formed the Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The university says the collection included early U.S. cookbooks, such as one printed in 1796, one published by an African American woman in 1866 and a Jewish cookbook published in America in 1871.

Germany's annual Oktoberfest festival is finally on again for this fall, following a two-year hiatus due to the coronavirus pandemic. The head of the famous Bavarian beer festival in Munich said Thursday the celebrations will be held without any pandemic restrictions from Sept. 17 to Oct. 3. Some 487 beer breweries, restaurants, fish grills, wine vendors and others will be present and opening hours will be even longer than in the past, with the first beer tents opening at 9 a.m. in the morning and closing at 10:30 p.m. The last orders will be taken at 9:30 p.m. A one-liter (two-pint) mug of beer will cost between 12.60 to 13.80 euros ($12.84-14.07) this year.

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Chrissy Teigen and her husband John Legend are expecting another child nearly two years after the couple suffered a pregnancy loss. Teigen made the announcement Wednesday on Instagram where she posted two photos of her baby bump. The 36-year-old model and cookbook author wrote “we have another on the way” in a post that comes after she had a miscarriage in 2020. She touched on her fertility journey and being too nervous to unveil her pregnancy. The couple share two children together.

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Employees at a Trader Joe’s supermarket in Massachusetts on Thursday became the latest workers at a major company to approve a labor union. The store in Hadley is the first Trader Joe’s with an employees union. Workers at two other company locations have initiated unionization efforts. The workers in Hadley are organizing under the name Trader Joe’s United, which will be an independent union and not affiliated with a larger existing union. Now that it's been approved, the next step is putting together a negotiating committee to hammer out a contract with the California-based company.

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English baking specialist and judge on “The Great British Baking Show” Paul Hollywood has returned to the basics this summer. He offers ultimate versions of recipes in the new cookbook “Bake.” The book is divided into six parts. There's cakes, cookies and scones, breads and flatbreads, pizzas and doughnuts, pastry and pies, and desserts. In addition to adding less sugar — and also less salt — Hollywood has put his own twist on certain recipes. For instance he asks for bread flour — also known as strong flour — in his scones. And he ditches lemon in favor of a lime meringue pie.

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Diana Kennedy, a tart-tongued British food writer devoted to Mexican cuisine, died Sunday. She was 99. Kennedy spent much of her life learning and preserving the traditional cooking and ingredients of her adopted home, a mission that even in her 80s had her driving hundreds of miles across her adopted country in a rattling truck as she searched remote villages for elusive recipes. Her nearly dozen cookbooks, reflect a lifetime of groundbreaking culinary contributions and her effort to collect vanishing culinary traditions, a mission that began long before the rest of the culinary world was giving Mexican cooking the respect she felt it was due.

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Long lines are back at outside food banks around the U.S. as working Americans overwhelmed by inflation increasingly seek handouts to feed their families. Many people are coming for the first time amid the skyrocketing grocery and gas prices. The food banks struggle to help even as federal programs provide less food, grocery store donations wane and cash gifts don't go nearly as far while U.S. inflation hits a 40-year high. Charitable food distribution has remained far above amounts given away before the coronavirus pandemic, even though demand tapered off somewhat late last year.

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U.S. inflation surged to a new four-decade high in June because of rising prices for gas, food and rent, squeezing household budgets and pressuring the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates aggressively -- trends that raise the risk of a recession. The government’s consumer price index soared 9.1% over the past year, the biggest yearly increase since 1981, with nearly half of the increase due to higher energy costs. Lower-income and Black and Hispanic American have been hit especially hard, since a disproportionate share of their income goes toward essentials such as transportation, housing and food. But with the cost of many goods and services rising faster than average incomes, a vast majority of Americans are feeling the pinch in their daily routines.

The state of Oregon has slashed financial penalties it assigned a baker who refused to bake a wedding cake for a lesbian couple almost 10 years ago. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports the Bureau of Labor and Industries is ordering Aaron Klein to pay $30,000 damages, instead of $135,000, in compliance with a state appeals court ruling earlier this year. Laurel and Rachel Bowman-Cryer initially filed a complaint against the bakery owners, saying they refused to bake them a wedding cake. The Oregon Court of Appeals twice upheld a ruling that found the bakery illegally discriminated against them. The court in January found the state agency didn't exhibit religious neutrality in issuing the fine.

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